Action for Brain Injury Week 2016

Action for Brain Injury Week 2016

6 May 2016

ABI Week takes place from the 9th-15th of May. The Headway Organisation will be campaigning for more support for those who are vulnerable and to highlight the effect recent cuts are having on the work they do. A crucial aim of Brain Injury Week is to draw awareness to the importance of getting medical attention if you receive/recently received a knock on the head.

A crucial aim of Brain Injury Week is to draw awareness to the importance of getting medical attention if you receive/recently received a knock on the head.

Brain injury survivors need help to rebuild their lives but funding cuts are cutting them out of society. Individuals and families affected by brain injury are finding their access to vital support services is being reduced and as a result are struggling.

We all need a brain to function. Our brain helps us survive and although it is relatively small, it connects everything together, processes emotions and makes us who we are.

Our brain is very fragile and can be severely damaged by the smallest knock. You may even show no signs of being hurt after a bang on the head. Although brain tissue can be damaged by a variety of things like infections, tumors, or strokes, any injury to the brain from an external force can result in a TBI (Traumatic brain Injury).

A blow to the head can lead to complications such as lack of oxygen, rising pressure and swelling to the brain. Quite often, there are no signs of being hurt after a bang on the head, but some of the common symptoms include:

  • Feeling faint/dizzy
  • Falling unconscious
  • Unable to remember the cause of the injury or events that occurred before or 24hours after
  • Difficulty remembering new information
  • Blurry vision
  • Confusion and disorientation
  • Nausea/vomiting

Although it can be difficult to predict/avoid a head injury, there are some steps you can take to help reduce the risk of serious injury to you or your friend.

These include:

  • reducing hazards in the home that may cause a fall
  • ‘childproofing’ your home
  • using the correct safety equipment for work, sport and DIY
  • wearing a safety helmet during certain activities, such as skiing or cycling

Going to hospital after a brain injury can be the difference between life and death. If you receive a bang on the head, the hospital is the only place that has a CAT scanner that can ‘look’ inside your head and determine if there is any bleeding in your brain.

If someone falls and still looks good on the outside- inside the skull there is a small chance slow bleeding may be taking place. After a concussion, the chances of this happening are not high (1 in 1000), but a CAT scan will detect this and can possibly prevent a brain injury.


Posted by: Administrator